ADVANCE $15
DAY OF SHOW: $20
Sun., September 22, 2013 at 7:00 PM

Audio / Video

About This Event

Minimum Age:

18+

Doors Open:

6:00 PM

Show Time:

7:00 PM

Description:

**On-sale Friday, July 19th at 12PM (EST)**
 
This is a general admission, standing event.

Artists

Portland Cello Project

Since the group’s inception in late 2007, the Portland Cello Project (or, PCP, as their fans affectionately call them), has wowed audiences all over the country with extravagant performances, everywhere from Prairie Home Companion, to that punk rock club in the part of town your grandma warns you not to go to after dark. The group has built a reputation mixing genres and blurring musical lines and perceptions wherever they go.
 
No two shows are alike, with a repertoire now numbering over 800 pieces of music you wouldn’t normally hear coming out of a cello. The Cello Project’s stage setup ranges from the very simple (4-6 cellos), to the all out epic (which has included 12 cellos playing with full choirs, winds, horns, and numerous percussion players).
 
The Cello Project’s mission is three-fold:
 
1: To bring the cello to places you wouldn’t normally hear it. (Everywhere from nightclubs to symphony halls, from sports bars to loading docks, from libraries to halftime at Portland Trailblazers games…)
2: To play music on the cello you wouldn’t normally hear played on the instrument. (Everything from Bach to Kanye to Pantera…)
3: To build bridges across all musical communities by bringing a diverse assortment of musical collaborators on stage with them. (Everyone from the Dandy Warhols to Peter Yarrow to Ben Sollee to Mirah to Garrison Keillor…)
 
Photo Credit: Tarina Westlund

special guest Jolie Holland

On her fourth studio album, Jolie Holland embraces the live-studio rock approach of the 60′s and 70′s, and transforms it with her unmistakable touch. Loosely inspired by Neil Young’s Zuma, with nods to The Velvet Underground, the Stones, and Bowie, this playful dialogue gives way to Holland’s most grounded work. Some of the lyrics were written tipsy on a train, others out of a trance state–every one drawn from the seemingly bottomless well of her muse. From the electrified sidling ode of “Gold and Yellow,” through the outright violence of “Remember,” to “Rex’s Blues”–a devastating Townes Van Zandt rendition, Holland’s inspirations and evolving aesthetic ring bell-clear in every song. Her complete vision for this album is evident from the songs’ sound to the handwritten liner notes; even the record’s cover is a watercolor painted by the artist herself.
 
As with the Living and the Dead, Holland co-produced this record in partnership with Shahzad Ismaily. Pint of Blood was similarly recorded in New York studios, as well as in private spaces, thanks to Shahzad’s consumate and highly creative engineering skills. Ismaily accompanies her on every song (drums, percussion, bass, back up singing, synthesizers, and very fine guitar work), with Grey Gersten adding his unique palette of electric guitar tones to many of the tracks. On the B side, guitar genius Mark Ribot joins Ismaily and Holland on her hallucinatory masterpiece “The Devil’s Sake.” Of Marc’s playing on that piece, Holland notes “when he stepped in, I realized no side player had ever understood the ins and outs of that song before him.”
 
The album was mixed in Portland, Oregon at Adam Selzer’s Type Foundary. The mix was executed by a triple team of Adam Selzer, Jolie Holland and Grey Gersten, with Shahzad on skype from Iceland giving his invaluable opinion here and there. At one point, they were graced by the presence of American musical luminary, Michael Hurley. Bopping out on the couch while listening to a mix of “Honey Girl,” Hurley declared, “Now you’re swimming. This is experimental. But it’s a successful experiment.”
 
In the third track she promises: “what I lost in a broken sphere/ I’ll find in a tender mirror/in the love from the heart.” Listeners will find their own lost parts in her voice, which captures the unnameable more succinctly than ever. She croons of the hardest kinds of love and most aching choices, along with the light and lovely. These ten songs are rich with moments to savor –evoking memories of moonlit fields, past lovers, and the childhood dream of summer. As always, her lyrics speak transparent and true as tender mirrors themselves. The mermaid adorning the album’s cover is an apt symbol for Holland’s work: a magical coupling of disparate tones. Pint of Blood is, as that old book says, as wise as serpents and as innocent as doves.
 
Photo credit: Scott Irvine

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