ADVANCE $16
DAY OF SHOW: $20

Audio / Video

About This Event

Minimum Age:

18+

Doors Open:

6:30 PM

Show Time:

7:30 PM

Description:

This is a general admission, standing event. Happy hour from 6:30-7:30pm including $3 well and $5 drinks.

Artists

LOOP

LOOP was formed in Croydon, London, 1986 by Robert Hampson (vocals/ guitar) and partner Beki Stewart (Bex) on drums. After finding Glen Ray on bass, through an advert in Melody Maker, they began to perform live and were quickly signed to HEAD Records run by Jeff Barrett (Heavenly) who released their feedback-drenched debut 12” 16 Dreams.


Following line-up changes – the arrival of new drummer John Wills, new bassist Neil MacKay and James Endeacott on second guitar the band were to take a more primal rhythmic foundation captured on their impressive debut full-length Heavens End (1987).


The band managed to hypnotize all with their discordant trance-like spell which served as an antidote to the prevailing trend in British pop at the time – they resurrected the concept of loud out there-rock for a new era, creating droning soundscapes of bleak beauty and harsh dissonance, loosely influenced by bands such as The Velvet Underground, The Stooges, The MC5, but retaining an avant-garde and experimental edge from Can, Faust, Neu!, Rhys Chatham, Glenn Branca and minimalist systems music, to name but a few. Live shows were revelatory, Loop, allowing LOUD as a constant descriptive term, they pushed PAs to the very edge of their existence, creating a sonic pummel not really experienced since.


A collection of singles and B-sides, The World in Your Eyes, appeared on HEAD in 1987 and after the departure of Endeacott the band signed to the Chapter 22 label, releasing the Collision 12” as well their more sparse and discordant second full-length, Fade Out.


With another label change, this time to Situation Two Records, the band replaced Endeacott’s vacant position with Scott Dowson and veered towards more ethereal soundscapes on A Gilded Eternity (1990) which was to be their final album.


After 4 years of pushing the boundaries, the band disbanded with only a BBC sessions collection Wolf Flow (1991) released after the band’s demise. The band’s catalogue was remastered and reissued on CD in 2008-2009.


Loop official site

Purling Hiss

It takes balls to let Purling Hiss get in your face- their records are a half-corroded, screaming roar of high-end guitars crushed together, obliterating vocals and drums with their singular assault. Well, if you’ve got balls, get ready to swing ‘em! With Water On Mars, Purling Hiss have broken out of the basement, run through the bedroom and are now loose, out in the streets, blasting one of the great guitar albums in the past couple minutes. Yes, Water On Mars, from the swirling sound of Purling Hiss – Drag City’s gonna let you have it, come March 19th, 2013!
 
Water On Mars is Purling Hiss’s first recording outside the fuzzy confines of Mike Polizze’s inner rock utopia, where the first three albums and EP were constructed in solitude with a home-recording setup. Over the past couple years, Polizze’s been working with a band and fine-tuning new songwriting ideas while playing shows all over the place. Now there is a center to the Hiss maelstrom, with Polizze’s guitars slugging, sizzling and spiraling their way around the rhythm throb, singing disaffected in shifts both aggro and slack (and around to the back) through the course of a song, with production highlighting the schiz by buffing the raw power into a streamlined blast. If that doesn’t rattle your caveman brain, nothing will! Purling Hiss have a deeply satisfying way of drawing from the red, white and blue wells of 60s, 70s, 80s and 90s rock to inform their own sound, giving things a retro ring while doing what they do in the Philadelphia of today – and no other time could apply, really. So bring your neanderthal face out to space, grab a glass, and prepare for a pour from Water On Mars, Purling Hiss’ first banger for Drag City, out in March!

Donovan Blanc
DJ Ning Nong (Raspberry Bulbs)
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