ADVANCE $12
DAY OF SHOW: $15
Tue., November 27, 2012 at 10:35 PM

Audio / Video

About This Event

Minimum Age:

18+

Doors Open:

10:00 PM

Show Time:

10:35 PM

Description:

**************************
TABLE SEATING POLICY
Table seating for all seated shows is reserved exclusively for ticket holders who purchase “Table Seating” tickets. By purchasing a “Table Seating” ticket you agree to also purchase a minimum of two food and/or beverage items per person. Table seating is first come, first seated. Please arrive early for the best choice of available seats. Seating begins when doors open. Tables are communal so you may be seated with other patrons. We do not take table reservations.
 

A standing room area is available by the bar for all guests who purchase “Standing Room” tickets. Food and beverage can be purchased at the bar but there is no minimum purchase required in this area.
 
All tickets sales are final. No refund or credits.

Artists

Jozef Van Wissem and Jim Jarmusch

Film director and screenwriter Jim Jarmusch is also a musician — not surprisingly, a very cinematic musician. His tastes in music are so much a part of his films: He often casts musicians in key roles and music as part of the storyline. Think about his film Down by Law, with saxophonist John Lurie and singer Tom Waits. Or Stranger Than Paradise, in which “I Put a Spell on You” by Screamin’ Jay Hawkins is a key character. The list is pretty long.
 
In 2010, Jarmusch curated the music festival All Tomorrow’s Parties and joined us as a guest DJ on All Songs Considered to talk about his picks including Sunn 0)))/Boris, Raekwon, Hope Sandoval and T-Model Ford, who all make music with a rather dark veneer. In his own music, Jarmusch can usually be found playing dense, languid guitar textures — this recording with Jozef Van Wissem is a fine example. Van Wissem plays the lute with his heart equally in the 17th and 21st century. His love for the Baroque seems equal to his love for cut and paste techniques and finding adventure in the antique.
 
Together the two musicians have made a record called The Mystery of Heaven and it’s out Nov 13th. Here’s a song from the record, called “Etimasia.”
-Bob Boilen via NPR
 

http://www.jozefvanwissem.com/

Marissa Nadler

Marissa Nadler has been performing since 2000, releasing a number of well-received studio albums, and most recently, July on Bella Union in early 2014. She taught herself to play guitar as a teenager, and at the age of 15 began to write her first songs. Her musical style has been described as “dream folk”, featuring her haunting mezzo-soprano over the steady foundation of her acoustic guitar. Lyrically, her music has a strong narrative aspect, featuring introspective and American Gothic themes complimented by reverb-laden instrumentation and production.

The Boston Globe wrote “She has a voice that, in mythological times, could have lured men to their deaths at sea, an intoxicating soprano drenched in gauzy reverb that hits bell-clear heights, lingers, and tapers off like rings of smoke”.

July, her first release on Sacred Bones (US) and Bella Union (EU) Records, was recorded at Seattle’s Avast Studio, pairing Nadler with producer Randall Dunn (Earth, Sunn O))), Wolves in the Throne Room). Dunn matches Nadler’s darkness by creating a multi-colored sonic palette that infuses new dimensions into her songs. July is the kind of release that reminds you why NPR counts Nadler’s songwriting as so “revered among an assortment of tastemakers”, and an album she couldn’t have made earlier in her career because, as every songwriter knows, she didn’t just write these songs: she lived them.
The question of whether Marissa Nadler’s elegant folk music ought to soundtrack our dreams or haunt our nightmares has been a thread through her uncannily cohesive catalogue. With six albums in 10 years and never a misstep, Nadler has grown her own perceptive language . . . Nadler has few direct contemporaries—Bill Callahan, Sharon Van Etten, or Alela Diane come to mind—but here, on July’s most extreme song ["Dead City Emily"], she could sensibly share bills with, say, Iceage or Deafheaven.” Pitchfork 8.1

On her sixth album, Boston-born singer-songwriter Marissa Nadler gets darker than ever before . . . Gone is the lithe, limber-voiced ingénue of last year’s ‘Wedding,’ and in her place lies Nadler’s blackest-ever-black album. New songs like ‘Was It a Dream’ and ‘Desire’ benefit from darker hired guns: Eyvind Kang’s strings, Steve Moore’s synths and the guitars of Phil Wandscher lend emotional heft and existential dread to these 11 phantasmagoric love songs.” NPR

July unfolds as a near-perfect song cycle.” All Music

Gorgeously ethereal” SPIN
Marissa Nadler official site
Marissa Nadler on Twitter
Marissa Nadler on Soundcloud

ter(); ?>